Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Edward Elgar

Friday, August 18, 2017


Classical iconoclast

July 17

Harrison Birtwistle Deep Time : Barenboim Prom 4

Classical iconoclast The UK premiere of Sir Harrison Birtwistle's Deep Time, at the Proms in the Royal Albert Hall,  with Daniel Barenboim who conducted the world premiere at the Philharmonie, Berlin, in May.this year.  Just as Barenboim's Elgar pedigree goes back a long way, so does his relationship with Birtwistle.  They've known each other since the 60's. Barenboim also gave the premieres of  Birtwistle's Exody in 1998 and of The Last Supper in 2000. In an interview for his publishers Boosey & Hawkes, Birtwistle explained the term "Deep Time".  "...coined by John McPhee in a 1981 book Basin and Range, which refers to the idea of measuring things on a vast temporal scale beyond human comprehension such as the age of rocks. The concept of Deep Time follows on from the work of the 18th century Scottish geologist James Hutton who proposed that the processes of rock erosion, sedimentation and formation have ‘no vestige of a beginning, no prospect of an end’, a state of perpetual change...."   It's an idea which fits in well with the concepts that seem to lie beneath so much of Birtwistle's work: stratas and layers,  levels of time parallel and co-existence, puzzles, mysteries and patterns, often evolving as if generated by abstract but organic life forces.  Earth Dances, of course, and The Triumph of Time but also mysteries like The Minotaur and Silbury Air.  Deep Time seems to evolve out of nothingness. Bars are marked in silence until sound emerges almost imperceptibly. Slow, circular figures dragging forward contarst with sparkling figures comprising short, quick-paced cells.   Rhythms build up quickly to an exuberant angular dance, which then morph into flying figures which float above the steady pulse.   Crashing metallic percussion, the growl of dark, low brass and woodwinds. Base, middle and top notes like a complex but earthy scent.  Large, dense structures and fleeting whips of high-pitched sound, propelling forward thrust.  A soprano saxophone calls, marking intervals: wooden blocks are beaten in typically wayward Birtwistle zig-zag patterns.  Planes of sound from strings and winds, suggesting boundless vistas.  Towards the conclusion, trickling, tiny fragments, quirky changes of direction, and a return to long, slow, rumbles. As the music passes onwards,  cymbals clash and long planes stretch until at last the music dissipates into nothingness once more. Not before the brass and metallic percussion assert themselves once more, in quirky farewell.  I didn't think so much of inexorably slow forces but of a multiplicity of actions on different levels.  Birtwistle is never boring!  He turned 83 this weekend, but creatively he's lithe and agile. 

Classical iconoclast

August 10

Elgar, Britten, Brian Elias Prom Wigglesworth BBC NOW

Toby Spence, Prom 32 photo : Chris Christoduolou, B|BC Four British composers, four different worlds : Britten, Brian Elias, Purcell and Elgar, Ryan Wigglesworth conducting the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Choir, Prom 32 Royal Albert Hall.   Wigglesworth and BBC NOW delivered a very fine Elgar's Enigma Variations . The Variations are so interesting  that it would only be "news" if it were exceptionally stellar or not done well, so if I don't write much about this performance, it's because it was thoroughly satisfying though not "news". What was unusual about this Prom were the pieces around it. Benjamin Britten's Ballad Of Heroes, Op 14, 1939  for example.  It' runs 15 minutes and is scored for (by Britten standards) a fairly large orchestra and choir, so doesn't get programmed other than in large-scale concerts where such forces are available.  Please read Paul Spicer's notes on Ballad of Heroes for Boosey & Hawkes HERE because they're comprehensive and by far the best, anywhere.   When I first heard the piece six years ago (Ilan Volkov BBCSO, Barbican) I didn't understand the piece but this time round it made much more sense.  The disparity between the poetry of W H Auden and the doggerel of Randall Swingler is a problem, but Britten uses it with a certain degree of irony.  Though the Spanish Civil War wasn't quite on the scale of 1914-1918, it was a modern political war, as opposed to a war between nations.  The International Brigades represented the idealism of the left versus the repression of Fascism.  Thus the contradictions in the piece provoke, just as the situation did. The piece is about a lot more than a conflict between pro and anti war.  It should be noted that the Spanish Civil War  ended in April 1939, with the triumph of the fascists and their Nazi allies.  The Ballad of Heroes isn't a call to war, by any means, but a scream of agony, directly contemporary.  It's also contemporary with Britten's Violin Concerto op 15 (1938/9) expressing the composer's anguish about the fate of Europe. He needed to get away, in order to believe in his ideals. As it happened, his experiences in America made him realize that things there weren't actually that good. Some still sneer at Britten for going abroad. They don't realize what strength it took for him to come back to Britain and face what needed to be done.  Through his music, Britten showed that there are other ways to stand up to violence.  Six years ago, Toby Spence sang the tenor solo, as he did for this Prom : in the years between he personally has been through a few struggles, and has come out the stronger for it. Excellent performance ! (Please read my other pieces on Britten, on music about war and Ernst Busch) Brian Elias's Cello Concerto, (2015) a BBC commission, received its world premiere with soloist Leonard Elschenbroich, replacing the dedicatee Natalie Clein at short notice.  It's a brooding piece making the most of the cello's dark timbre. Frantic bowing suggests movement and speed, through which rip whips of high-pitched winds and lively percussion.  Part way, the orchestra takes over, the cello biding its time with a growl, then returning to the fray.  Pounding brassy flourishes in the orchestra, not just from the brass.   I've written about Elias's Electra Mourns, Geranos and Meet Me in the Green Glen, released on CD through NMC Recordings in April. Read my review HERE.  Ryan Wigglesworth is himself a composer  and has always had a good feel for new music. And from one of the earliest known British composers, Henry Purcell Jehova, quam multi suntm in an arrangement by Edward Elgar for choir, tenor (Toby Spence again) and bass (Henry Waddington) conducted by one of the best conductors of British choral music (and a stalwart of the Three Choirs Festival), Adrian Partington.  




Tribuna musical

August 9

Festival Barenboim en Buenos Aires: Primera parte

Conocí los valores de Daniel Barenboim ya desde su adolescencia y festejé que tras un amplio período de ausencia (provocado por haber decidido no presentarse cuando lo convocaron para el servicio militar y en consecuencia ser considerado desertor; tras largas gestiones se lo disculpó) volviera convocado por el Mozarteum al frente de la Orquesta de París en 1980. De allí en más volvió como pianista o como director para esa institución en 1989, 1995 (con la Staatskapelle de Berlín, de la que es director vitalicio), 2.000 (con la Sinfónica de Chicago, habiendo sucedido a Solti), 2002 (ciclo completo de las sonatas de Beethoven compartido entre el Mozarteum y el Colón), 2004, 2005 (primera visita de la Orquesta West-Eastern Divan), 2008 (con la Staatskapelle y fuera del Colón, en restauración) y 2010. Todo esto antes de sus Festivales.             Por otro lado, escuché a Martha Argerich a partir de 1965; hasta 1970 la pude apreciar en nueve conciertos en Buenos Aires y uno en Praga, donde luego compartí un souper con ella, Dutoit (entonces su marido) y Antonio Pini, gran amigo con quien luego trabajé en 1973 cuando fue nombrado Director Artístico del Colón (fue echado en Agosto por Jacovella, Krieger y Zubillaga). 1965 fue el primer año de mi revista y le hice una entrevista; tanto en esa como en el souper la encontré espontánea, simpática, bella y ajena a todo divismo. Vinieron luego años en los que no quiso volver debido a la dictadura, pero eventualmente le pasó lo mismo que a Barenboim; los recuerdos de infancia y de juventud hicieron que ella, cuya popularidad mundial era inmensa, quisiera acercarse a sus raíces, e influida por su amigo el pianista Hubert, surgió la idea de hacer en Buenos Aires Festivales Argerich semejantes a los que había armado en otros lados. Martha, personalidad gregaria con una multitud de amigos músicos, y única entre los grandes pianistas, para entonces tocando sólo cámara o con orquesta, presentó su primer Festival en 1999 incluyendo un Concurso Internacional (donde integré el jurado de selección, convocado por su gran amiga María Rosa Oubiña de Castro). Siguieron los Festivales hasta 2005, cuando fue ignominiosamente echada por la Orquesta Filarmónica; naturalmente esto provocó un hiato en su presencia en nuestra ciudad. Pero años después, tras una transición donde actuó en Rosario invitada por músicos amigos, supo García Caffi del acercamiento entre ella y Barenboim y se logró convencerla que retornara, y así los Festivales Barenboim la tuvieron como muy especial gran figura en varios años recientes, con enorme repercusión. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             Curiosamente, el amplio programa de mano incluye biografías de ella, de Barenboim y de la WEDO (West-Eastern Divan Orchestra), pero no hace referencia a los festivales Barenboim. La primera condición de un crítico es no cegarse, y debo decir que la gigantesca carrera de este artista excepcional no implica que sus decisiones sean siempre correctas, y hubo a veces altibajos. Como hice notar en el Herald, no quedé contento con el Festival del año pasado, donde sólo tres de los seis conciertos me parecieron a la altura, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta su alto costo. Este año son cuatro los conciertos del festival, y están mucho más equilibrados. Claro está que Barenboim sigue siendo un “workaholic” (obsesionado por el trabajo intenso), y con repeticiones en funciones no de abono sino extraordinarias, más dos para el Mozarteum (que siempre lo contrató paralelamente a los festivales, y que el Colón no se digna mencionarlo en su gacetilla semanal pese a que los conciertos se hacen allí), más la mala idea de un concierto al aire libre en la Plaza Vaticano, gratis (que se hubiera podido frustrar por mal tiempo y al que no fui), Barenboim participó en nueve conciertos en diez días (y Argerich en cinco, en cinco días). No hubo esta vez charlas de reflexión con Felipe González (curioso addendum en un festival musical).  Y mi mujer, enclaustrada en nuestro departamento por un problema de salud, sufrió los problemas del streaming: dos anunciados pero no emitidos, y uno donde toda la primera parte tuvo el sonido desfasado: si tan mal dominan el tema, mejor no hacerlo.             Barenboim ofreció una conferencia de prensa el lunes anterior al sábado en el que empezó el festival, en el Salón Blanco del Colón. Estuve allí y sólo quiero mencionar algunas cosas. Por supuesto, se desarrolló con la inteligencia de un músico pensante y abarcador. Ante todo, algunas noticias importantes: a)      En el Festival del año próximo no vendrán ni Argerich ni la WEDO. En cambio, la Orquesta de la Staatsoper Berlin retornará y será orquesta de foso en “Tristán e Isolda” de Wagner (no sólo para el festival sino también para la temporada lírica), pero además dará conciertos. b)      Para 2019 volverá Argerich para festejar los 70 años de su primer concierto en el Colón. Y para 2020, cuando Barenboim tenga 78 años, hará lo propio con su primer concierto en el Colón. Y unas frases interesantes: Martha parece sólo intuitiva pero no lo es; Nadia Boulanger decía: hay que llenar la estructura con emoción y viceversa; refiriéndose al Festival: yo me ocupo del por supuesto, Diemecke del presupuesto…; ante una pregunta de Varacalli, defiende la gran calidad de las sinfonías de Elgar; para él el mejor beethoveniano fue Arrau; no hay un sentimiento europeo ahora, no hay cultura común ni suficiente educación; siempre se habla de los derechos humanos;¿y las responsabilidades?; la nueva sala redonda de Berlín logra una gran unidad comunitaria.             En este artículo me referiré a los dos primeros conciertos del Festival (los cuatro sería demasiado largo).      PRIMER CONCIERTO             El año próximo se conmemora el centenario del fallecimiento de Debussy, pero como no vendrá Argerich, decidieron hacerle un homenaje anticipado con un programa todo Debussy, con obras originales para dos pianos y piano a cuatro manos pero también con transcripciones de obras orquestales del creador francés y una curiosidad, la que hizo de la obertura “El Holandés errante” de Wagner. El resultado me resultó variable, ya que esta última es un trabajo mediocre de transcripción; un tipo de tarea que Liszt hacía mucho mejor. Y además distó de ser perfecta la ejecución (sí, hasta con los grandes pasa).             Creo que ambos tocaron en pianos Barenboim, de los cuales no estoy del todo convencido, sobre todo en graves (me suenan borrosos) y agudos (demasiado faltos de cuerpo), aunque en las octavas centrales los timbres me resultan mucho más gratos, sobre todo cuando se requiere transparencia. El dato no está en el programa pero no me sonaron a los pianos habituales. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             Pero con los refinados y tardíos Seis Epígrafes Antiguos (cuatro manos) volvió la magia de estos intérpretes excepcionales, tocando con una sutileza y un buen gusto que valorizaron cada fragmento al máximo. Y fueron extraordinarios en la obra para dos pianos “En blanco y negro”, también de 1915, la época de los Doce estudios y de un estilo más seco, menos impresionista, impactado por la guerra; esta música a veces áspera y muy virtuosística tuvo una versión ideal.             La breve y raramente ejecutada “Lindaraja” (1901) inició la Segunda Parte; dominada por un motivo exótico, con ostinatos y ritmos hispánicos, fue cabalmente ejecutada. Luego, y aunque la transcripción es fina y elegante, extrañé el sonido de la flauta durante el “Preludio a la siesta de un fauno”, por más que la melodía fuera moldeada admirablemente por Barenboim y Argerich diera el máximo color a los acompañamientos. Y finalmente, el fantástico mundo de “La Mer”, nuevamente en una notable transcripción muy difícil e intrincada,  para dos pianos, pero yo escuchaba en mi mente la miríada de colores de la orquesta.  Los pianistas lograron una notable versión.             Lamenté que haya tres transcripciones, ya que se hubieran podido escuchar de Debussy la muy temprana  Sinfonía para dos pianos en un movimiento, o la Balada para piano a cuatro manos, y también a cuatro manos, la Pequeña Suite. O la Marcha Escocesa para cuatro manos, que luego orquestó.             La inesperada yapa fue el Bailecito de Guastavino, tocado con nostalgia y refinamiento por estos dos veteranos y talentosos argentinos. En todo el programa, ella intuitiva e imaginativa, de impresionante naturalidad y facilidad, él siempre estructurado y claro; pero estos temperamentos diferentes saben amalgamarse, más allá de algún detalle no del todo exacto.                                                 SEGUNDO CONCIERTO             Fue valioso el concierto de la WEDO, pero no por Argerich sino por las dúctiles y sensitivas versiones de dos espléndidas obras de Ravel y por  lograr resolver satisfactoriamente las tremendas vallas de las Tres Piezas de Berg.  No está de más recordar que la WEDO no es una orquesta estable, sino que se reúne anualmente durante el verano europeo para ensayar desde su sede andaluza y luego dar conciertos en distintos lugares. Sigue formada por artistas israelíes y palestinos, más algunos otros de países árabes y cierta cantidad de españoles, y siendo una orquesta que pone el acento en artistas jóvenes, renueva parcialmente sus filas cada año. Muchos de ellos  forman parte de otras orquestas durante el resto del año.  Y bajo la égida firme pero afectuosa de Barenboim logran un espíritu de compañerismo que aleja las diferencias de la política. Son un símbolo de la convivencia y de la paz pero también han logrado una calidad que los lleva al Festival de Salzburgo. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli             En “Le Tombeau de Couperin” el sentido de la palabra “tombeau” no es “tumba” sino “homenaje”, ya que así se usaba el término en el siglo XVIII. El original de la obra raveliana es para piano y consta de seis fragmentos, pero la orquestación conservó sólo cuatro, de una exquisita factura y poder de evocación. Una orquesta liviana y transparente manejada con mano sutil por Barenboim y con solos de una belleza poco común en manos del oboísta. Y aquí una queja: como en otros años, no hay nómina de la orquesta, de modo que uno aplaude a  anónimos cuando el director los invita a pararse para recibir el aplauso del público. Dan (no oficialmente) un motivo de seguridad (quizá ligado a presuntas represalias contra sus familias si no están de acuerdo ciertos grupos acérrimos con las ideas pacíficas de Barenboim) pero también podría ocurrir que el público esté en riesgo, ya que ir a verlos es un tácito sí a ese ideal. Y bien, el mundo de hoy es peligroso, pero anonimizar a artistas no me parece justo hacia sus carreras. Sobre todo cuando, como ocurrió el año pasado, hubo ese concierto de música árabe que identificaba a todos los que tocaban: ¿seguridad para algunos pero no para otros?             Hace diez años Argerich tocó el Concierto Nº1 de Shostakovich en su último Festival, que se hizo en el Gran Rex, y estuve en desacuerdo con su interpretación; ella no cambió y yo tampoco. Conozco muy bien ese concierto y tengo tres grabaciones: todas respetan los tempi marcados por el autor, pero no Argerich, que convierte al Allegro moderato en un Allegro Molto en dos cruciales puntos de la obra y causa aprietos en la orquesta de cuerdas y en el trompeta solista que la acompaña en ciertos momentos. Es increíble que a sus 76 años pueda tocar con  tan asombrosa soltura y exactitud a esas velocidades vertiginosas, pero cambia el sentido de la obra; además, como es capaz de producir un volumen no menos asombroso, relegó a las cuerdas, que incluso con un director como Barenboim sonaron como un lejano y endeble acompañamiento. Quien merece un aplauso especial es el trompetista Bassam Massud, que tocó admirablemente, afinado y a ritmo; no fue identificado en el programa pero el colega Pablo Gianera obtuvo el dato y lo publicó en La Nación.             Se sabe de la reticencia de Argerich a tocar sola, de modo que Barenboim se unió en la pieza extra (mal llamada aquí bis) para ejecutar a cuatro manos el fragmento final de la obra que iniciaría la Segunda Parte, la Suite de “Ma Mère l´Oye”, “Le jardin féérique” (“El jardín feérico”), interpretado con luminosa claridad por los pianistas.             La Segunda Parte nos regaló la referida Suite en sus cinco fragmentos, detallados con refinamiento e impecable gusto por un director que no en vano fue el titular de la Orquesta de París durante muchos años,  que sabe llegar al fortissimo sin violencia y dar matices instrumentales impresionistas. Y su orquesta, que nada tiene de francesa, lo pareció.             Pero lo importante no sólo de este concierto sino del Festival fue la segunda ejecución en Buenos Aires de una esencial obra de la Segunda Escuela de Viena: las Tres piezas op.6 de Alban Berg, sólo ejecutadas hará unas cuatro décadas (no tengo el dato exacto) en un fabuloso concierto de la Orquesta de Cleveland dirigida por Lorin Maazel para el Mozarteum en el Colón que además incluyó otro estreno local, nada menos que “Three places in New England” de Charles Ives.  Sólo Alejo Pérez dirigiendo a la Orquesta del Teatro Argentino en La Plata se les animó: ni la Sinfónica Nacional ni la Orquesta Filarmónica de Buenos Aires las tocaron. Dí este dato a Barenboim en la conferencia de prensa con Diemecke presente. foto: Arnaldo Corombaroli              Berg las escribió entre 1913 y 1915, y retocó la orquestación en 1923 y 1930. Si bien sólo conozco la versión definitiva, no me cabe duda de sus tremendas innovaciones y apabullante dificultad. Hay en ellas un evidente homenaje a las Cinco piezas de su maestro Schönberg y a los famosos martillazos del último movimiento de la Sexta de Mahler, pero mucho más es sólo de Berg, en una partitura densísima y fuertemente expresionista. El Präludium nace y muere en el mero ruido pero en sus cinco minutos hay una superposición de timbres y de instrumentos y se necesita coordinar temas, motivos y ritmos. Sigue “Reigen” (“Rondas”, seis minutos), muy variado en sus texturas y que incluye un vals “a la Berg”. Y finaliza con “Marsch”, casi diez minutos, la más ardua marcha que yo conozca, como la describe Boulez “una casi demente intoxicación del gesto dramático” que llega a un climax de extremo poder. Sólo una orquesta de calidad preparada por un experto convencido puede hacerle justicia a una obra de tanta complejidad e impacto emocional que parece escrita ayer, y ello tras muy intensos ensayos. Y eso es lo que supieron plasmar Barenboim y la WEDO. Mientras la escuchaba me surgían imágenes de Edvard Munch o de Egon Schiele, pintores de la angustia existencial. Por supuesto, tras esta música no cabe tocar nada más.  Pablo Bardin

On An Overgrown Path

August 5

We have created a cat video culture

In a supportive Facebook comment about my post lamenting the sanitising of social media, world music maven Joshua Cheek recommends "When in doubt, post cat videos. That's all that is expected of you." Joshua's comment is much more than an amusing throw away line. 'Cat video' can be used as a surrogate for any content that attracts an audience by slavishly respecting established comfort zones. And it not just social media that is stuffed full of cat video content: our concert halls are full of the music equivalent, as is the broadcast media. Everywhere the mantra has become, when in doubt, create cat video content, that's all that is expected of you. Classic FM is a perfect example of cat video content. A recent Classic FM press release spinning a "huge increase in under-35 listeners" has been used by those with a vested interest in defending the establishment's stranglehold on classical music to prove that the art form is in rude health. The RAJAR figures quoted by Classic FM and its boosters are undoubtedly accurate. But a quick scan of this Classic FM chart - which is a good measure of the station's playlists - for the week in which the news was announced, shows that the light at the end of the tunnel is no more than yet another dumbing down train coming the other way. Classic FM Chart: July 30th 2017 1 Dunkirk soundtrack Hans Zimmer 2 Islands - Essential Einaudu, Ludovico Einaudi 3 War for the Planet of the Apes soundtrack - Michael Giacchino 4 The 50 Greatest Pieces of Classical Music, LPO/PARRY 5 Peaceful Piano, various artists 6 Believe, Jonathan Antoine 7 Singing My Dreams, Carly Paoli 8 Game of Thrones, Season 6 soundtrack - Ramin Djawadi 9 Gladiator soundtrack - Hans Zimmer & Lisa Gerrard 10 Spider-Man, Homecoming soundtrack - Michael Giacchino 11 Elements - Ludovico Einaudi 12 Elgar/Dream of Gerontius - Staatskapelle Berlin/Barenboim 13 New Greatest Hits 1969-1999 - John Williams 14 Three Worlds - Music from Woolf Works - Max Richter 15 Wonder Woman - Rupert Gregson Williams 16 The Little Mermaid soundtrack - Alan Menken 17 40 Most Beautiful British Classics - Paillard/BBC SO 18 Summertime - Craig Ogden 19 The Lord of the Rings Trilogy soundtrack - Howard Shore 20 The Blue Notebooks - Max Richter Of course we need film sountracks in moderation, just as we need cat videos in moderation. But if you feed young children nothing other than baby food they don't develop teeth and as result become dependant on baby food. Similarly if you feed audiences - young or old - a diet of Hans Zimmer, Max Richer and Ludovico Einaudi they do not develop an appetite for anything more chewy. It is a common fallacy that Peaceful Piano by various artists is the first step towards appreciating Schoenberg. In fact the Peaceful Piano virus results in risk-averse audiences; as the empty seats at the recent Salonen Stravinsky/Ravel/John Adams BBC Prom and - even more surprisingly - at the Barenboim Birtwitle/Elgar Prom prove. Attracting a new audience by dumbing down does nothing more than encourage yet more dumbing down to retain that prized new audience. The result is lose, lose. As we see at the struggling BBC Radio 3, which is now too dumb for its once-loyal core audience but not dumb enough for the Classic FM market. One of the music establishment's social media mullahs gleefully re-tweeted Classic FM's news of young audience growth with the ironic comment "Death of classical music: latest". Yes, it is indeed true that classical music is not dead. But if the cure is Classic FM, we should be considering euthanasia. Also on Facebook and Twitter. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use" for critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s).



On An Overgrown Path

August 3

If it was good enough for Gustav Mahler...

On the left is Charles Villiers Stanford. In 1910 Gustav Mahler conducted Stanford's Symphony No. 3 'Irish' in New York. Twenty-two years earlier the symphony had been played during the first season of the new Concertguebouw in Amsterdam*, and it was also conducted by Hans Bulow in Hamburg and Berlin and championed by Hans Richter. Yet quite inexplicably Stanford's Irish Symphony has only been played once at the Proms, and that was in 1895. Moreover none of Stanford's other six symphonies have ever had Proms outings. Although Charles Villier Stanford's symphonies have been resolutely ignored in the concert hall they have one distinguished advocate on record, the late and much missed Vernon Handley. His cycle of the complete symphonies with the Ulster Orchestra for Chandos is a triumph. If any evidence is needed that Stanford was not - as Elgar alleged - just a composer of rhapsodies, it is provided by Tod Handley's accounts of the terminally-forgotten sixth and seventh symphonies. Arguments about masterpieces or not are irrelevant. Because if Stanford's music was good enough for Gustav Mahler in New York it must be good enough for 21st century Proms audiences. If Mahler was around today I am sure he would paraphrase Carl Nielsen and declare that... The right of life is stronger than the most sublime art, and even if we reached agreement on the fact that now the best and most beautiful has been achieved, mankind thirsting more for life and adventure than perception, would rise and shout in one voice: give us something else, give us something new, indeed for Heaven's sake give us Stanford's 'Irish' Symphony, and let us feel that we are still alive, instead of constantly going around in deedless admiration for my First Symphony.* Many influential commentators, including Lewis Foreman in the Chandos booklet, state that Stanford's Irish Symphony was played at the opening concert of the Concertgebouw in 1888. This has passed into classical music folklore but is wrong. The Concertgebouw opening concert took place on 11 April 1888, and the programme was Beethoven, Bach and Sweelinck. Stanford's Irish Symphony was played in the Concertgebouw on 3 November 1888 for a different but still very distinguished occasion, the first concert of the newly-formed Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by Willem Kes. Any copyrighted material is included as "fair use" for critical analysis only, and will be removed at the request of copyright owner(s). Also on Facebook and Twitter.

Edward Elgar
(1857 – 1934)

Sir Edward William Elgar (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire. Among his best-known compositions are orchestral works including the Enigma Variations, the Pomp and Circumstance Marches, concertos for violin and cello, and two symphonies. He also composed choral works, including The Dream of Gerontius, chamber music and songs. Although Elgar is often regarded as a typically English composer, most of his musical influences were not from England but from continental Europe. He felt himself to be an outsider, not only musically, but socially. In musical circles dominated by academics, he was a self-taught composer; in Protestant Britain, his Roman Catholicism was regarded with suspicion in some quarters; and in the class-conscious society of Victorian and Edwardian Britain, he was acutely sensitive about his humble origins even after he achieved recognition. After a series of moderately successful works his Enigma Variations (1899) became immediately popular in Britain and overseas. His later full-length religious choral works were well received but have not entered the regular repertory. The first of his Pomp and Circumstance Marches (1901) is well-known in the UK and in the US. Elgar has been described as the first composer to take the gramophone seriously. Between 1914 and 1925, he conducted a series of recordings of his works. The introduction of the microphone in 1925 made far more accurate sound reproduction possible, and Elgar made new recordings of most of his major orchestral.



[+] More news (Edward Elgar)
Aug 12
Meeting in Music
Aug 10
Classical iconoclast
Aug 10
The Independant -...
Aug 9
Tribuna musical
Aug 5
On An Overgrown Path
Aug 4
Norman Lebrecht -...
Aug 4
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 3
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 3
On An Overgrown Path
Aug 2
Wordpress Sphere
Aug 2
Tribuna musical
Aug 1
Wordpress Sphere
Jul 28
FT.com Music
Jul 27
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jul 19
Topix - Opera
Jul 18
On An Overgrown Path
Jul 17
Classical iconoclast
Jul 17
FT.com Music
Jul 17
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jul 17
Classical iconoclast

Edward Elgar




Elgar on the web...

Vladimir Ashkenazy Interview

 Interview [EN]

 

Vladimir Ashkenazy Interview



Edward Elgar »

Great composers of classical music

Enigma Variations Cello Concerto Pump And Circumstance

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...